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WHAT IS A WORLD OF WORK?

A World of Work is a free, online educational resource. Its broad goal is to raise awareness about the contributions of workers around the world, whether that work be through ideas or the skill of hands. One of its extended goals is to inspire schoolchildren to take part in the project, interview people in their community or beyond, and submit their findings to our website to be edited and shaped into a flipbook. The website consists mainly of two parts: a portal though which answers to a questionnaire and relevant photos may be submitted, and a section where all questionnaires and photos have been edited into short biographies and turned into flipbooks.

WHERE DOES WORLD OF WORK COLLECT ITS STORIES?

All stories come from the questionnaires submitted to our website. Submissions may be direct (the answers are about you) or indirect (the answers are those of someone you have interviewed).

CAN I SUBMIT MORE THAN ONE QUESTIONNAIRE/STORY?

Yes, as many as you would like.

HOW DO I BRING A WORLD OF WORK INTO THE CLASSROOM?

There are many ways to use A World of World in the classroom (Montessori teachers, in particular will appreciate how the activities suggested below may serve as extensions for the lessons on Fundamental Needs and Interdependencies):

  • Print out the biographies, or have them available on a tablet, and have students illustrate them, as well as research the jobs and places mentioned;
  • Use a globe to find the locations of the workers to stimulate geography work – learning about continents and countries, drawing maps, etc.;
  • Have students select a biography and use the Questionnaire as models or templates to conduct their own interviews with people they know, take photographs of their interviewees, and shape the information they gather into a short biography;
  • Have students select a biography and use the Questionnaire as models or templates to conduct research on jobs that they find intriguing and write fictional biographies or autobiographies of characters who might hold those jobs;
  • Using the Questionnaire, students interview elders, if possible using video recording, and create a community oral history library;
  • Using the Questionnaire, students research famous or little-known historical figures who have contributed significantly through their work, ideas, inventions, or skills.